Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Mary Biever’

Saturday Night Live was groundbreaking 35 years ago.  I was young but remember the chatter; everyone wondered what would happen because they performed live to a national audience.

Now, as a speaker, Twitter back-channels change everything I’ve known for the past 25 years.  Though first it scared me, I love it.  What is it?

It’s a live feed Twitter stream where members of the audience comment live, during your presentation. They share a common hashtag for conversation. You may see the conversation live on a screen while you present.

This is the biggest change for public speakers since the advent of television.  Mark Zuckerburg of Facebook first discovered its perils at SXSW in 2008, when his audience revolted via Twitter.  Wired published  an article about it, SXSW: 2008, the Year the Audience Keynoted.

 How can you survive and thrive with Presentation Night Live?

  1. Tweet. Get comfortable with Twitter.  Know how to follow hashtags. Set one for your presentation if one isn’t given. Share your Twitter handle with your audience. Have access to the Twitter conversation. Bring a device with you, view it from a screen, or designate a trusted friend to view it close to you and share information.
  2. Prepare. Prep your talk and publish the materials. Either use Prezi or Slideshare and show your stuff. 
  3. Practice. Every phrase and sentence can be tweeted. Know your stuff and do it well, and you’ve got great publicity with a large audience.
  4. Seek. Feedback. Give sample presentations to the smartest, toughest friends you have, who will tell you exactly what they think. Listen to their feedback and adjust.
  5. Engage. Listen to your audience and adjust your talk to the feedback. 

Five verbs: tweet, prepare, practice, seek, and engage. Giving a talk with a back-channel is as exciting as skiing down the tough slopes at the resort. You never know when you begin what will happen during the ride. It’s not easy. With practice, the ride can be the thrill of a lifetime.  If you crash, you can view the instant replays via hashtag and figure out how to do better next time.

There’s a learning curve to backchannels for moms like me who remember when Saturday Night Live began. It’s worth the effort.  As a speaker, it’s the new What to Prepare accessory for your Presentation ensemble.

Read Full Post »

Today on Twitter, @OldSpice posted a Youtube, Like All Great Things This Too Must End.  Supposedly, it’s the end of the Old Spice Guy’s media campaign.  Isaiah Mustafa, in character, tells us the campaign has ended.

Not a chance.

Old Spice was a breakout campaign that gets the current economy plus the social media demographic, and uses them well.

  1. A high percentage of Facebook and Twitter users are women.  If a company uses social media well, listens, and responds quickly, those women will buy the product.  Companies who employ only female spokesmodels for their products in social media have 0% understanding of the market.
  2. Isaiah is perfectly cast and is brilliant.  Women are more likely to buy something from a “ridiculously handsome man” than a gorgeous lady.  It’s not just his look; it’s his demeanor. Because he’s funny, guys will like him too.
  3. Times are tough.  The economy is hard.  We are looking for can-do heroes who handle whatever life throws at them – even if it’s a silverfish hand catch. Old Spice Guy does that, without breaking a sweat or blinking an eye.
  4. He listens.  When someone tweets a question, he tweets the answer. Maybe it’s an answering machine message.  Or a marriage proposal.  Whatever the question, he responds quickly and efficiently.
  5. When you watch his Youtubes or read his tweets, you just get a gut instinct this is a genuinely nice guy.  Wouldn’t he be a blast at your next party?
  6. The Old Spice traditional website has not kept up with the Facebook, Twitter, or Youtube updates; it gets updated last.  Their website is driving traffic to those locations.  Twitter directs traffic to its Youtube.  Facebook directs to the website, the store, Twitter, and Youtube.
  7. “Look at him. Look at me.”  It’s not all about the Old Spice Guy but about inspiring all of us to be Old Spice guys.

This is the beginning of social media optimization – not a billboard blast with backlinks out the wazoo.  Instead, it’s a conversation in a story  And we can all be part of that story.  Our tweet could inspire the next viral Youtube.

I can just see Old Spice Guy who got gold medals at exotic car throwing contests going to the oil spill with his chain saw and fixing it. 

Faster than Chuck Norris.

Can Old Spice guy’s breakout success be repeated? I don’t know.  I do know it’s the beginning of the end of the old marketing model.

Read Full Post »

Competitors arrived at 5 p.m. and learned what the contest was about.  They had until 6:30 p.m. to design and put together their robot for the contest.  During their experiment time, they could test the course.

This is what they were given:

A terrible oil spill has happened this summer in the Gulf of Mexico.  Robots are being used to assist in the cleanup.  You must decide how your robot is going to improve the situation.  You will have 2 runs during the contest.  You can practice run before the contest. You have 5 minutes maximum for each run.

  1. Swap containment cap: Remove cap from pipe and replace it with another one. (10 points, for removal of the first cap and 20 more points, for placing the other cap on it.
  2. Move berms off the shore and into the ocean to try to prevent the oil from coming ashore. (5 points per berm that reaches the new goal.)
  3. Pick up tar balls from distant shore. (1 point per tar ball)
  4. Caution: avoid hitting the 2 oil skimmers. (robot dogs) (3 point deduction per hit)
  5. Avoid hitting the hydro fire oil boom (10 point deduction per hit)

As an added bonus, since this related to a real life scenario, each team could try for bonus points in Internet research. A laptop with Internet access was provided if they wanted to use it.

Bonus Questions (1 point each):

You may use the Internet to find answers to these questions.

  1. When did the oil spill begin?
  2. What is the name of the oil company that had the oil spill?
  3. Which of these challenges listed has a robot really been doing this weekend?
  4. How is a new containment cap supposed to help with oil spill cleanup?
  5. What do the berms do?
  6. What are tar balls, and where are they?
  7. What is the job of the oil skimmers?
  8. How has the Jones Act, or Merchant Marine Act of 1920, impacted oil spill cleanup?
  9. What is a species of animal impacted by the spill and how does it impacts them?
  10. What is a business or industry hurt by the oil spill and how?
  11. What does a hydro fire oil boom do?
  12. The largest maker of oil spill equipment in the U.S. is in Carmi, Illinois. What is its name?

I hoped the contest would help the participants better understand different problems and solutions with the oil spill, so they could better follow future updates on it. 

Our contest this year experimented with new features we had never seen tried.  We changed the judging with individual judging plus team judging.  We added an impromptu Internet research unit.

How did our changes work? That’s tomorrow’s blog.

Read Full Post »

My kids have been involved in robotics contests the past 4 years.  They enjoy them, and I love the varied skills learned in a single contest.  First, there are the technical skills: a problem is presented, and a whole team has to work to solve it.  Physics, mechanics, engineering ingenuity, and computer programming are all key elements.  Second, there are team building skills: team members must learn to communicate and work together.

Besides being a parent, I’m a 4-H leader in Evansville, Indiana.  4-H has a major emphasis towards science, engineering, and technology and has a national goal of inspiring 1 million new scientists for our new century.  I began the process to have a robotics project in our county. 

A robotics project wasn’t enough, however.  We needed a club that focused on technology.  I didn’t want a robotics club; when Edison invented the light bulb, were there light bulb clubs? It’s more than robotics.  Our information revolution is the biggest transformer of world culture since the Industrial Revolution, and I wanted our kids to be ready to be the best riders in the world Technological Rodeo.

So we began a Technology Club.  (Actually, the kids in the club voted they didn’t like that name and renamed it Tech Club.)  At each monthly meeting, we have a different workshop topic in engineering, electrical science, aerospace, computers, and physics.  Each member tackles a 4-H project in one of those areas and gives a demonstration each year in one of those areas.

Our county sends several teen 4-H members every summer to participate in science and engineering workshops.  I hope, with our club, we raise the interest in those workshops and the knowledge base of those who participate.

We also organize our county’s robotics contest. The last 2 years, the contest has mirrored other contests in which my kids participate, with teams competing against one another.  Our contest is an impromptu design contest;  kids don’t know until they arrive what the challenge is and have limited time in which to complete it.

This year’s contest adds an element almost out of a reality show.  In addition to the team contest, we will have judges observing the competitors individually.  They will evaluate the competitors both in problem solving and team building skills.  And they will award an individual champion in each of 3 age divisions. I have not seen another robotics contest try this twist and am curious to see how the experiment works.

Problem Solving:

  1. Understands challenges presented and develops strategies to overcome them.
  2. Develops a good robotics design for the challenge.
  3. Assists in robotic programming to meet the challenge.
  4. Demonstrates strong troubleshooting skills.
  5. Is able to make needed adjustments to robotic design or problem solving.

 Team Building: 

  1. Participates on the team.
  2. Communicates constructively with other team members, actively listening to them.
  3. Encourages participation of all team members; pulls strengths from individuals to build a better team.
  4. Takes good care of robot and its parts.
  5. Treats everyone in the robotics contest in a respectful and supportive manner.

My goal is to teach the 4-H members to not only strive to win but to strive to win well.  We’ll know later tonight whether my experiment to mix up the contest is a success or an epic fail.

Either way, our leaders and our club will learn by doing.

Read Full Post »

The giant sucking sound you hear is the hole that opens in your heart when you realize your pet is missing.

If you are well connected on social media, Facebook and Twitter can help you look for your pet.  Here’s how to look on Facebook:

Digit's FB photo helped his owners find him!

  1. Have a digital picture of your pet on your computer.  Make it a shot where your pet is easily recognizable. I don’t recommend including people or kids in the shot. You want people to see the pet, not the people. Especially don’t recommend kids in the photo to protect their privacy.

  2. Make sure your Facebook friend lists includes some neighbors who live in your area.
  3. Find Facebook pages of media outlets in your area. WIKY in Evansville, Indiana, posts lost pet photos as a service to its fans. “Like” them. If none in your area offer this service, ask your favorite one if they will.
  4. If your pet disappears, post the picture of your missing pet on your wall.  Do this directly in Facebook, not from Hootsuite. You want the link to be sharable.
  5. In the caption area, tell the pet’s name, breed if it helps, any special characteristics, where the pet was lost, and contact info to reach you. If you have a landline and a cell, I would post the landline phone # as you don’t know where this will go.
  6. If a media outlet helps with this in your area, send the photo of your missing pet to them. 
  7. Ask your friends to share your photo with their friends, and pray the right person sees the photo. Be sure to ask them to show the picture to everyone in their family at home.

My Facebook friends had a Saturday night drama with a missing dog last night.  Digit’s owner posted this photo and the situation.  Her drama had a happy ending. 

 The daughter of a mutual friend of ours, who lives nearby, took her kids in a walk, hoping to see Digit.  They spotted Digit, cowering in the doorway of a nearby college fraternity.  Digit was terrified, but my friend’s resourceful daughter acted like a Dog Whisperer to calm him and coax him to their home.

Because our friend’s family had seen Digit’s photo on FB, they knew who he was and where he belonged.  They, and other friends began posting details of his find on different Facebook walls.  By this time, people who knew neither the owner nor Digit were part of the story.  We were all glad to read Digit was back home with his happy family.

Another friend posted on my wall that she had posted a photo on FB when her dog disappeared a month ago.  A friend saw the photo, was visiting the dog pound, and recognized her lost dog at the pound.  Her dog was saved because of a photo on Facebook.

Then a friend shared that she found a lost dog on her porch, posted his photo on FB, and he was returned to his owners. She added, “Facebook saved him.”

If you’re on Twitter, you could do the same with Twitpic and tweets, but that’s another blog.

Read Full Post »

Image representing Twitter as depicted in Crun...
Image via CrunchBase

“You just do THAT Twitter thing for money,” I was told last week by a 15 year old.

After I stopped laughing, I explained that what I did on Twitter was talk to people. She didn’t believe me.

She had a Twitter account which had had exactly 1 Tweet.  I showed her how to search Twitter for information.  She’s active in an organization, and I showed her the national tweets.  The national level had asked a question with a hashtag.  I explained the hash tag and showed her how to reply to the question.

That was the Helen Keller Moment.  You know the kind – when Helen figures out that water is what’s being spelled in her hand.  Realization dawned on her.

“You can ANSWER people on Twitter?”

Yes.

“And they talk back to you?”

She tweeted her first reply, with a hash tag.

The national organization tweeted her back in less than an hour.  Now, she got it.

It will be awhile before she tweets regularly.  But now, she gets it.

Where else would a 15 year old girl from America’s heartland be able to publicly answer a question at a national level and receive a prompt reply?

Twitter is the great equalizer at happy hour.  What matters is your content and what you can bring to the conversation. 

American pioneers migrated here so they could get a chance to own their own farm or build their dreams, outside an Old World caste system.

The new digital pioneers can do the same thing.  If you tweet well, listen, engage, and write well, you can talk to anyone. Chances are, if they are listening, they will reply.

Do I do “THAT Twitter thing” for money? No.  I do it for the conversations. As I learn, and build connections in this new world, I see new opportunities to make money. I meet people who will help me earn a living.

Students who can use Twitter well have a whole world of new opportunities – to get more current information than their textbooks and to engage in conversations in industrial thought leaders.

My question to you: how can we help others to have Helen Keller moments so they too decide to become digital pioneers? Comment below.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

If hens could text, this is what they would say. Written to the tune of the Chicken Dance.

Our eggs are laid. Our eggs are laid. (They wave their beaks)

Come get them now. Come get them now. (They flap their wings.)

Our eggs are laid. Our eggs are laid. (They shake their tails.)

Come get them now. Come get them now. (They clap their beaks.)

Oh girls, let’s beware the rooster. He is prowling about.

We can outsmart him.  We’ll run faster, escape, and wear him out. (During the chorus, the hens race to outrun the rooster before he catches them.)

Repeat the song all morning. Then all afternoon. The hens win some and lose some. Until it’s evening and time for the chickens to come home to roost.

[For real time updates on this song, check the Tweeting Hen’s Twitter.]

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »